BIOGRAPHY

Tony Belilovskiy

Principal, C3 Excellence, Sarasota, FL, USA


Tony Belilovskiy joined the C3 Excellence team following a very successful career in healthcare and business. His diverse expertise includes engineering in metallurgy, ballistics, licensed clinician, healthcare administration, HR, auditor, healthcare consulting, and entrepreneurial business ownership. His experience ranges from clinical, healthcare administration, healthcare IT, contract administration and negotiations, financial analysis, quality and leadership, culture change, project management and strategic planning, business and people management, systems implementations and mergers, data analysis, data migration, medical claims analysis, college and university course development, and varied projects that come with owning your own management consulting business. Tony holds both Bachelors in Cardiopulmonary Sciences and Masters in Healthcare Management and Administration from Northeastern University in Boston, MA; Associates Degree in Metallurgy from Odessa Polytechnic Institute in Odessa, Ukraine. He is a Registered Respiratory Therapist and Certified Professional Coder. In addition to all of the above, Tony is also an accomplished classical pianist. He resides in Sarasota, FL with his wife of over 20 years and 3 daughters.

ABSTRACT

Measuring the Seemingly Immeasurable

The more important something is, the more we want to measure it. The better we measure it, the more we understand. It’s a curious fact that many of the most important business and customer priorities often go unmeasured. Many leaders struggle to answer a key question: How can we use measures to connect enterprise performance, customer satisfaction and knowledge work to drive improvement? Strategic and business plans commonly include measures of success, but few of them are directly relevant to knowledge work or to what customers care about. The last thing we need is to inadvertently communicate to our customers that we aren’t on the same page with them. This webinar shows you how to fix this mismatch. We begin this session with the premise that we want to improve performance and customer satisfaction, but need a better way to address challenges such as:•Strategic objectives look more like milestones or glorified to-do’s than numerical measures of success•Dedicated employees don’t understand or can’t personally relate their daily work to enterprise strategy•Surveys which ask the wrong questions at the wrong time of the wrong people for the wrong reasons, leading to misdirected or limited improvement efforts•Performance measurement invokes thoughts of boredom, depression, torture or escape•Squishy customer perceptions appear to defy translation into objective, unambiguous measures•The most expensive knowledge work is poorly measured (if at all)The higher in the organizational hierarchy we are, the less likely we are to characterize our work as measurable products, let alone measure the performance of- or satisfaction with- that work. The total cost of that work to the enterprise is significant. On the other hand, work performed by the lowest level employees is measured six ways from Sunday. We know the unit cost to produce a cell phone or a package delivery. What we usually don’t know is the cost to create an engineering drawing, a route map or an answer. While “rework” in the manufacturing context is well-defined and measured, we may refer to the office equivalent as simply “revisions” and let it go at that. This session goes a long way to fixing these issues.Learning ObjectivesThe most common way we measure satisfaction is by survey. Yet the most important customer demands are frequently not addressed at all on those surveys or are measured in such a way that it’s unclear what to change for improvement. We also tend to measure best what they care about least, and vice versa. Join us for this interactive webinar to learn the following:•Define strategic objectives in a way that average employees find personally relevant.•Measure intangible knowledge and service work•Translate and measure seemingly immeasurable (squishy perception)•Connect measures with the design criteria•Apply the power of Kano, QFD and other esoteric design methods with the simplicity of adding 2+2•Create survey questions that are meaningful and drive action

JUST A FEW OF THE LEAN SIX SIGMA WORLD CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS

Government Organizations




Corporations

““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““
““ ““ ““ ““ ““ ““

CONTACT US

info@leanandsixsigma.org 

© Copyright 2022 Lean Six Sigma World Organization

Log in