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Making Lean & Six Sigma Belt Candidates Successful

Amy Sarah Al-Sahsah, Lean Six Sigma Black Belt, Greene, Tweed and Company, Allentown, PA, USA

Keywords: Training, Candidate, Lean Six Sigma

Industry: All

Level: Intermediate

ABSTRACT

When deploying a Belt program and/or improvement initiative it is important to identify, train, develop and retain individuals to lead and sustain your initiative and organization’s improvement culture. Lean and Six Sigma candidacy presents its own set of challenges with ulterior motives, candidate limitations and retention goals. This discussion focuses on candidate success and coaching and mentoring to ensure success for both the individual and the organization. The entire organization is accountable for the deployment and the roles of champions, team members and continuous improvement professionals will also be spoken to.

Choosing the right candidate for the right level of the training and project depth is of the utmost importance. A discussion of what goes right and what goes wrong will be presented replete with disaster recovery. A graceful exit from the program will also be discussed. Case studies and candidate profiles will be presented with a focus on success of both the individual and the integrity of the program. In addition to these topics, matching candidate personalities and their role in the organization with belt level and Lean or Six Sigma concentrations will be discussed. Manufacturing belt candidates as well as transactional candidates will be discussed. Customer service, maintenance, shipping and receiving, accounting and sales and marketing are some examples of transactional candidates that will be reviewed.

Some certification models will also be discussed as well as basic requirements of each belt level expected in industry. During this talk, anyone can take the recommendations and run with them wherever their organization happens to be on the continuum. The ubiquitous pyramid of Yellow/Blue Belts, Green and Black Belt skill levels will be discussed as well as an entertaining candidate profile sampling from a population of over 300 individuals. The tagline for this talk is “No Child Left Behind” or “It Takes a Village.”

Proposal Submission Deadline:
October 11, 2019

Acceptance notification date:
November 11, 2019

Early Registration Deadline:
February 11, 2020

Please make sure to review and prepare the material needed before you start the on-line Proposal Submission Form. Click here to see Proposal Submission Guidelines.

Who May Submit: This online form may be used by a principal speaker, co-speaker, contact person, or a committee member submitting on behalf of a speaker.

Multiple Proposals: You may submit multiple proposals.

Conference Registration Fee:
The conference registration fee is waived for the principal speaker of accepted proposals. Speakers are responsible for their travel expenses and arrangements. Co-speakers will receive a 30% discount for the conference that they are presenting at.

Length of Presentations: Technical sessions are typically 35 minutes. There will be a limited number of "double" sessions, 70 minutes, at the end of each day.

Call for Proposals

You will need the following to submit a proposal

Proposal Title: Maximum 80 characters including spaces. 

Keywords:Please include three keywords with a maximum of 100 characters, including spaces. 

Industry Sector: Please select the most relevant Industry sector for the proposal from a list.

Abstract: The Abstract should be 1,500 to 5,000 characters (note that it is Characters, NOT words), including spaces.

Biography: The Biography must be 1,500 to 5,000 characters, including spaces.

Public Profile: LinkedIn or Public Profile for link for the Principal Speaker: 

Speaker's Photo (optional)

Sample Video (optional)

Government Organizations




Corporations

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