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Signs That Your LSS Deployment Is Failing

Presenter: Ken Feldman, Principal Consultant, Optec Consulting, Aventura, FL, USA

Keywords: Deployment, Failing, LSS

Industry: Financial Services, Manufacturing, Service

Level: Intermediate


ABSTRACT

The graveyard of LSS deployments is filled with well-intentioned organizations who went from a state of healthy activity to a terminal state. Some were slow and agonizing deaths while others were more rapid.

Each year at the conference we hear tales of woe regarding a sputtering or dying deployment. This presentation will offer some signs or signals that participants might look for in their deployments.

This presentation will start with a few quick questions to the audience for a response. For example:

1. How many of you have been part of a deployment which is effectively dead today?

2. How many of you feel that your current deployment may be in a death spiral?

It is difficult to predict and react to save a victim who had a heart attack or stroke although there are a few indicators. Recovery is slow if not impossible. It is unlikely that a Lean Six Sigma deployment that abruptly changes course can be predicted and the eventual death spiral stopped in time, but there will usually be some leading indicator of eventual heart attack or stroke. I will focus primarily on those that are going through the "death of a thousand cuts" rather than the guillotine. I will present 10 signs or signals that I have personally observed and been part of in previous Lean Six Sigma deployments. A few example of those are:

1. The dumbing down of training and skills development

2. The slackening of senior level engagement and support

3. The drift away from the selection of high-value projects

4. The failure to track and monitor benefits

The discussion of each will present a clear explanation of what to look for so that an organization can possibly put some corrective action in place to halt the slide. Some level of discussion as to possible actions will take place. The signs presented will include a cross-section of different industries.


Call for Proposals

Proposal Submission Deadline:
October 11, 2019

Acceptance notification date:
November 11, 2019

Early Registration Deadline:
February 11, 2020

Please make sure to review and prepare the material needed before you start the on-line Proposal Submission Form. Click here to see Proposal Submission Guidelines.

Who May Submit: This online form may be used by a principal speaker, co-speaker, contact person, or a committee member submitting on behalf of a speaker.

Multiple Proposals: You may submit multiple proposals.

Conference Registration Fee:
The conference registration fee is waived for the principal speaker of accepted proposals. Speakers are responsible for their travel expenses and arrangements. Co-speakers will receive a 30% discount for the conference that they are presenting at.

Length of Presentations: Technical sessions are typically 35 minutes. There will be a limited number of "double" sessions, 70 minutes, at the end of each day.

You will need the following to submit a proposal

Proposal Title: Maximum 80 characters including spaces. 

Keywords:Please include three keywords with a maximum of 100 characters, including spaces. 

Industry Sector: Please select the most relevant Industry sector for the proposal from a list.

Abstract: The Abstract should be 1,500 to 5,000 characters (note that it is Characters, NOT words), including spaces.

Biography: The Biography must be 1,500 to 5,000 characters, including spaces.

Public Profile: LinkedIn or Public Profile for link for the Principal Speaker: 

Speaker's Photo (optional)

Sample Video (optional)

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