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Team Facilitation for Every Lean Six Sigma Professional

Presenter: Erik Christensen, President, Las Vegas Lean Six Sigma, Henderson, NV, USA

Keywords: Facilitation, Change Management, Metrics

Industry: Customer Service, Government, Service

Level: Basic


ABSTRACT

Facilitation, change management and metrics:

A frustrating situation for many Lean Six Sigma professionals is the lack of implementation, follow through and sustainment of solutions. Green and Black belts often generate well thought out and analyzed solutions to complicated work problems; those solutions are implemented at various work centers only to find a lack of sustainment. Sustainment is a key advantage of Lean Six Sigma over traditional problem solving and is required to achieve continuous improvement. Lack of sustainment is one of the biggest challenges to the credibility of Lean Six Sigma as an organizational philosophy and can lead to executives thinking “This Lean Six Sigma stuff does not work”.

One cause of this situation is that many Lean Six Sigma professionals are very good at understanding “What” and “Why”, but struggle with “How”. Understanding “What” means knowing the situation, the process or the problem…this is a core Lean Six Sigma skill and most of us do well in the define stage. Answering “Why” is another core competency and leads to root cause analysis, Y=f(x) and other analyze phase tools. However, figuring out “How” to implement a sustainable solution is more difficult because the element of people is introduced. People are these strange, emotional creatures who often do not behave in a logical manner. The human phenomena must be recognized, understood and planned for, otherwise Lean Six Sigma initiates fail to achieve lasting results.

This session will begin with change management and review of Q x A = I, next attendees are put in small groups to practice brainstorming and affinity diagramming, and we wrap up with discussion and video about the power of metrics. The teaching philosophy is to create attendee interactions by using open-ended questions and hands-on simulations.


Call for Proposals

Proposal Submission Deadline:
October 11, 2019

Acceptance notification date:
November 11, 2019

Early Registration Deadline:
February 11, 2020

Please make sure to review and prepare the material needed before you start the on-line Proposal Submission Form. Click here to see Proposal Submission Guidelines.

Who May Submit: This online form may be used by a principal speaker, co-speaker, contact person, or a committee member submitting on behalf of a speaker.

Multiple Proposals: You may submit multiple proposals.

Conference Registration Fee:
The conference registration fee is waived for the principal speaker of accepted proposals. Speakers are responsible for their travel expenses and arrangements. Co-speakers will receive a 30% discount for the conference that they are presenting at.

Length of Presentations: Technical sessions are typically 35 minutes. There will be a limited number of "double" sessions, 70 minutes, at the end of each day.

You will need the following to submit a proposal

Proposal Title: Maximum 80 characters including spaces. 

Keywords:Please include three keywords with a maximum of 100 characters, including spaces. 

Industry Sector: Please select the most relevant Industry sector for the proposal from a list.

Abstract: The Abstract should be 1,500 to 5,000 characters (note that it is Characters, NOT words), including spaces.

Biography: The Biography must be 1,500 to 5,000 characters, including spaces.

Public Profile: LinkedIn or Public Profile for link for the Principal Speaker: 

Speaker's Photo (optional)

Sample Video (optional)

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