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Too Lean? Too Much Focus on Value-Added Processes Creates Non-Value Added Conditions

Bob Doering, Quality Engineer, CorrectSPC, LaGrange, USA

Keywords: Lean, Value-Added, Non Value-Added

Industry: Manufacturing

Level: Intermediate

ABSTRACT

Many Lean practitioners are driven to reduce waste by eliminating activities deemed to be non-value added. Overzealous changes without evaluation of their risk of failure can spell disaster to the Lean implementation. Two problems can arise from this scenario. One is applying the Lean concepts “too much” to the point that the process slips into an out of control condition. The second is mis-categorizing activities as Non-Value Added that are not Value-Added, but are necessary to prevent a process from becoming Non-Value Added. Although these activities do not add value, they assure that the value is protected from being lost. They form a third leg of lean, equally as important as Value-Added and Non-Value Added. These activities must not be targeted to be reduced or eliminated, or the process will suffer.

In this presentation, a case study that examines several examples of activities that are not Value Added, but absolutely necessary for maintenance of process ability to remain Value Added. Two areas where these problems are discussed are in gaging application and process specifications. It will also examine a process that is “too lean”, causing it to vary more than it would if the Lean concepts were more judiciously applied. This presentation should provide a caveat to all Lean practitioners that not all activities that are not Value Added need to be eliminated, and even those actions that seem to be wasteful uses of resources may actually be critical to the process success.


Call for Proposals

Proposal Submission Deadline:
October 11, 2019

Acceptance notification date:
November 11, 2019

Early Registration Deadline:
February 11, 2020

Please make sure to review and prepare the material needed before you start the on-line Proposal Submission Form. Click here to see Proposal Submission Guidelines.

Who May Submit: This online form may be used by a principal speaker, co-speaker, contact person, or a committee member submitting on behalf of a speaker.

Multiple Proposals: You may submit multiple proposals.

Conference Registration Fee:
The conference registration fee is waived for the principal speaker of accepted proposals. Speakers are responsible for their travel expenses and arrangements. Co-speakers will receive a 30% discount for the conference that they are presenting at.

Length of Presentations: Technical sessions are typically 35 minutes. There will be a limited number of "double" sessions, 70 minutes, at the end of each day.

You will need the following to submit a proposal

Proposal Title: Maximum 80 characters including spaces. 

Keywords:Please include three keywords with a maximum of 100 characters, including spaces. 

Industry Sector: Please select the most relevant Industry sector for the proposal from a list.

Abstract: The Abstract should be 1,500 to 5,000 characters (note that it is Characters, NOT words), including spaces.

Biography: The Biography must be 1,500 to 5,000 characters, including spaces.

Public Profile: LinkedIn or Public Profile for link for the Principal Speaker: 

Speaker's Photo (optional)

Sample Video (optional)

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